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bruce conner drawings

13 Nov 20
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Composed of tiny, intricate, filigree patterns on white paper, inkblots became Conner’s main artistic medium in the last decades of his life, during which he experimented with amplified scale. frame: 13 1/4 x 21 1/4 in. Images inspired by nature, Leaf September 11-December 7, 2001, and Dark Leaf, relate to elegiac drawings the artist made in response to the 9/11 attacks. He received his BFA at Nebraska University in 1956 and continued his studies with scholarships at the Brooklyn Museum Art School and the University of Colorado. A decade later, these collages became the source material for a series of photo etchings produced with Kathan Brown at Crown Point Press in Oakland, CA and published in 1971-73. Another notable print series dating from 1971 is titled DENNIS HOPPER ONE MAN SHOW The genesis for this print project dates back to the late 1950s, when Conner began a series of paper collages using fragments of 19th-century engraved illustrations styled on those by French Surrealist Max Ernst. In the mid-1970s and continuing sporadically for the rest of his career, Conner produced inkblot drawings of startling variety and innovation: grids of small, calligraphic shapes executed by blotting small puddles of ink between the folds of accordion-pleated sheets of paper. Formally rigorous, these maze- like drawings negate external references and dissolve figure/ground boundaries. Believing hand-drawn and inked lithography interfered with the precision of his imagery, the artist chose a commercial offset process, flouting print world conventions by using photomechanical rather than fine art printing. In 2000, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, organized a retrospective of Conner’s work titled “2000 BC: THE BRUCE CONNER STORY, PART II,” which traveled to the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, the M.H. An outlier in the exhibition, the imagery harkens to Conner’s groundbreaking films of the 1970s such as Crossroads, 1976. Other prints relate to film projects or collage pieces, such as BOMBHEAD, originally conceived as a collage and later transferred and produced as an inkjet print. INKBLOT DRAWING AUGUST 4, 1975 (detail), 1975. ink. His work has been included in major exhibitions, such as the historic 1961 “The Art of Assemblage” at the Museum of Modern Art. Linking the artist’s extensive graphic oeuvre to his work in other media is a command of light and shadow that permeates images hovering between fugitive and eternal, fantasy and reality. A would-be collaboration with his friend, the poet Michael McClure (1932–2020), DECK was conceived of as a set of cards, each printed with a single inkblot lithograph on one side and a pair of words on the reverse. (33.7 x 54 cm). Shown here as a group for the first time, Conner’s DECK drawings speak to the artist’s pioneering peripatetic yet iterative practice. Drawings and prints of later years are credited to “Anonymous” and “Anonymouse”, two of several alter egos invented by Conner to manipulate the idea of artistic identity and authorship. E-Catalogue: Bruce Conner, Afterimage, The Prints of Bruce Conner, 2012 In the mid-1970s and continuing sporadically for the rest of his career, Conner produced inkblot drawings of startling variety and innovation: grids of small, calligraphic shapes executed by blotting small puddles of ink between the folds of accordion-pleated sheets of paper. Rather than recognizing his works as fixed products, Conner consistently edited or repurposed his own drawings, sculptures and films. Conner printed a limited number of unbound etchings, which will be on view in the exhibition. Conner’s DECK drawings speak to the artist’s pioneering peripatetic yet iterative practice. A would-be collaboration with his friend, the poet Michael McClure (1932–2020), DECK was conceived of as a set of cards, each printed with a lithographic reproduction of single inkblot on one side and a pair of words on the reverse. In 1970, concerned about the fugitive nature of his felt tip drawings, Conner initiated the meticulous reproduction of the images at Kaiser Graphics, a commercial printer in Oakland, California. His use of disparate appropriated and recycled materials parallel the techniques used to make the films and assemblages for which he is well known. Though DECK was never completed, Conner returned to his original drawings in the 1990s, reordering them as singles and TRIOS—a move that was consistent with his collage mentality and disregard for traditional boundaries of artmaking. frame: 13 1/4 x 21 1/4 in. (40 x 34.3 cm) Inquire Born in McPherson, Kansas, Bruce Conner (1933–2008) was raised in Wichita where he attended Wichita University. de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco, and the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art. E-Catalogue: Bruce Conner, Dennis Hopper One Man Show , 2016. The spectrum of complex patterns in these early DECK works illustrates Conner’s burgeoning experimentation and deft mastery of the medium. Conner’s immersive felt-tip drawing process took on a performative aspect as the artist spent continuous hours making them, never lifting pen from paper in order to produce a graphically uninterrupted line. Born in McPherson, Kansas, Bruce Conner (1933–2008) was raised in Wichita where he attended Wichita University. (15.2 x 10.2 cm), frame: 13 1/4 x 21 1/4 in. Rather than recognizing his works as fixed products, Conner consistently edited or repurposed his own drawings, sculptures and films. 6 x 4 in. Conner’s collages depict a surreal, hallucinatory universe populated by images of flora and fauna, machine parts, and disembodied figures. In 2016, Conner was the subject of the major monographic survey “BRUCE CONNER: IT’S ALL TRUE,” which opened at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and traveled to San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid. Emerging from the West Coast countercultural movement, he restlessly explored mysticism and spirituality, punk rock and psychedelia, while tenaciously rejecting American jingoism and consumerism. frame: 15 3/4 x 13 1/2 in. The discrete inkblots were created in 1975 for Conner’s unrealized DECK project. (33.7 x 54 cm). (33.7 x 54 cm). Acting simultaneously as artwork and as foil for a larger conceptual project, this series is considered by many to be among Conner’s major works. One of the foremost American artists of the postwar era, Bruce Conner (1933–2008) worked across a vast range of media including drawing, sculpture, collage, painting, photography, printmaking, and film. Though DECK was never completed, Conner returned to his original drawings in the 1990s, reordering them as singles and TRIOS—a move that was consistent with his collage-mentality and disregard for traditional boundaries of artmaking.

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